logo
Legimus intellegam ea est, tamquam appellantur nec ei. Dicant perfecto deserunt quo id, ea etiam impetus pri. Mel ne vidit laboramus definiebas, quo esse aeterno
News – edu|FOCUS
no-animation
4
archive,category,category-news,category-4,edgt-core-1.1.1,kolumn-ver-1.3.1,,edgtf-smooth-page-transitions,ajax,edgtf-theme-skin-dark,edgtf-blog-installed,edgtf-header-standard,edgtf-fixed-on-scroll,edgtf-default-mobile-header,edgtf-sticky-up-mobile-header,edgtf-animate-drop-down,edgtf-search-covers-header,edgtf-side-menu-slide-from-right,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.2,vc_responsive

News

50 years ago, Dr. King told these Philly kids to lay a blueprint, and they did

Dennis Kemp didn’t know who was going to climb out of the limousine. Kemp was a 9th grader at Barratt Junior High School in October 1967 when the school's vice principal asked him and other members of the stage crew to greet a guest arriving for a special assembly. Kemp, who played on the school’s basketball team, thought the mystery celebrity might be the Philadelphia 76ers behemoth Wilt Chamberlain. Then the car door swung open, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped out onto South 16th Street. “It was amazing,” Kemp said. “I’ll never forget it.” King was in town for a star-studded rally at the Spectrum, the since-demolished sports arena that King would describe that day as a “new, impressive structure.” Thanks to a connection made by legendary Philly DJ Georgie Woods (“the guy with the goods”), King stopped first at Barratt, which has since been shuttered. He spoke for just 20 minutes, riveting the mostly black student body with a speech that focused on uplift, racial pride, and putting the onus on them to make better lives. “I wanna ask you a question,” King began. “And that is: What is in your life’s blueprint?” The Philadelphia Public School Notebook...

In Conversation: Black Female Tech CEOs on Leveling the Playing Field for Youth of Color

At a time when the women’s movement is making headlines across the country, females remain vastly underrepresented in the industry that shapes our future: technology. This underrepresentation is especially prevalent for women of color. For example, African-American women hold only three percent of computing occupations, according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology. This isn’t a pipeline problem. Girls Who Code reports that 74 percent of young girls express interest in STEM fields and computer science. Many organizations, including Black Girls CODE and DreamBox Learning, work to ensure that girls of color have ample opportunities to learn in-demand skills in technology so they will become lifelong learners who are equipped to reshape their skills as the workforce evolves. These two organizations share a bold vision of a future where girls of color are not simply “surviving” the information-driven globalized world, but are thriving and will become principal drivers of technological innovation through the next century. Two African-American, female CEOs at the helm of technology companies—Jessie Woolley-Wilson, CEO of DreamBox Learning, and Kimberly Bryant, CEO of Black Girls CODE—recently sat down with each other to discuss how technology and innovation will level the playing field to increase opportunity for youth of color. Jessie Woolley-Wilson: It’s wonderful to talk with you about how important it is to grow opportunities for young girls in the area of technology. Tell me about your own educational background and what inspired you to learn how to code. We absolutely must look at how current processes and systems disenfranchise women of color all along the STEM pipeline from kindergarten and beyond. Kimberly BryantKimberly Bryant: I’m actually an engineer (electrical) by trade and not a computer scientist. I graduated from Vanderbilt University with a B.E. in Electrical Engineering and a minor in Math and Computer Science. My first introduction to computer programming was during my college years and was heavily focused on machine language due to my major concentration in electrical engineering. But it was my first class in Fortran and spending many long nights in the computer lab that introduced me to the sometimes brutal and yet rewarding path of a computer scientist. JWW: Your story will no doubt inspire a lot of young women in computer science to believe in the value of hard work and perseverance. One of the things I’m passionate about is the belief that all children can excel at learning, no matter where they start, where they live, or who they are. In what ways do you believe educational experiences have changed, and how do you see them continuing to evolve? KB: When I graduated from college, the worldwide web was still a relatively new phenomenon with which not many non-academic or government folks were familiar. In most cases, learning a new skill, tool, et cetera, was not as accessible as it is today now that the internet has narrowed the boundaries for accessing information and democratized learning—to a certain extent. Students today have broader opportunities for learning in non-traditional environments than those that were available to...

What Service-Learning and Global Goals Taught Us About Promoting the Greater Good

Service-learning PD, Image Credit: Weaver Elementary SchoolLast April, the entire faculty at Bettie Weaver Elementary School spent an afternoon making rice heating pads for local elderly residents, capes for foster children to help endure long hospital stays and jump ropes braided out of plastic bags that were later given to schools in Haiti by three of our teachers. We spent three hours working together toward a common goal: serving others. On this county-wide professional development day, while teachers at many schools around Chesterfield watched the clock, thinking about papers that needed to be graded and plans that needed to be written, the staff at Weaver Elementary spent the day immersed in service and learning together. Concerns about how to manage to-do lists faded and compliance was no longer the reason for showing up. Teachers were engaged with one another and felt empowered to make a difference. One Word PD Reflections,Image Credit: Weaver Elementary SchoolWhen three hours had passed, we had a hard time getting the staff to leave. As an exit ticket, teachers filled out a one-word reflection on the day. “Uplifting,” “rewarding,” “inspiring” and “joyful” are not typically words you hear after a 3-hour PD session. That’s when we realized what we had learned at the service-learning conference we’d attended just a month earlier could make change in our community. As we glanced around the room at stations filled with piles of heating pads, capes and jump ropes, we knew something special had happened. We wondered if the power of serving others could bring our school from good to great and from compliant to engaged. A New Priority Weaver Elementary, located outside Richmond, VA, in Chesterfield County, is named after long-time Chesterfield educator and historian, Mrs. Bettie Weaver. She was committed to authentic learning and connecting to the community and the environment. With a devotion to embracing the ideals of its namesake, our school has had a history of academic excellence through community relationships and involvement. In fall of 2016, when Chesterfield County Public Schools began reworking its strategic plans, the district challenged principals to “imagine tomorrow,” rethink what a school experience should be and determine what each school stood for. Our transition to project-based learning environments in 2013 allowed us to elevate student voice and choice and when students reflected on which projects resonated most, we learned that they cared most deeply about projects involving service toward others. Recognizing the profound effect of that work, we determined that a commitment to service-learning would be a key component to continuing our success. Getting Schooled At the beginning of our quest to reimagine our school, we thought of service-learning as a curricular approach in which students use academic knowledge and skills to address community needs. But as we later learned, curriculum was only one piece of the puzzle; if we wanted to prioritize service-learning, we’d need to connect with our community, get buy-in and take action. After attending the National Service-Learning Conference in March 2017, which was sponsored by the National Youth Leadership Council (NYLC), we realized there was much...

50 years ago, Dr. King told these Philly kids to lay a blueprint, and they did

Dennis Kemp didn’t know who was going to climb out of the limousine. Kemp was a 9th grader at Barratt Junior High School in October 1967 when the school's vice principal asked him and other members of the stage crew to greet a guest arriving for a special assembly. Kemp, who played on the school’s basketball team, thought the mystery celebrity might be the Philadelphia 76ers behemoth Wilt Chamberlain. Then the car door swung open, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped out onto South 16th Street. “It was amazing,” Kemp said. “I’ll never forget it.” King was in town for a star-studded rally at the Spectrum, the since-demolished sports arena that King would describe that day as a “new, impressive structure.” Thanks to a connection made by legendary Philly DJ Georgie Woods (“the guy with the goods”), King stopped first at Barratt, which has since been shuttered. He spoke for just 20 minutes, riveting the mostly black student body with a speech that focused on uplift, racial pride, and putting the onus on them to make better lives. “I wanna ask you a question,” King began. “And that is: What is in your life’s blueprint?” The Philadelphia Public School Notebook...

Poll: Most U.S. Teachers Want Gun Control, Not Guns To Carry

LA Johnson/NPR LA Johnson/NPR Nearly three-fourths of U.S. teachers do not want to carry guns in school, and they overwhelmingly favor gun control measures over security steps meant to "harden" schools, according to a new Gallup poll. The nationally representative poll of nearly 500 K-12 teachers was conducted earlier this month, after the Parkland, Fla., shooting and student protests brought national attention to the issue of gun violence. Some of the poll was released last week. In that portion, 73 percent of teachers opposed training teachers and staff to carry guns in school. Of those, 63 percent "strongly" opposed the proposal. In addition, 7 in 10 teachers said arming teachers would not be effective in limiting casualties in a school shooting. In the part of the poll released Thursday, teachers were asked in an open-ended question to name one thing that could be done to prevent U.S. school shootings. One-third named gun control or stricter gun laws, the most popular response. The second leading response, with 22 percent, was bans on specific guns. One in 5 suggested enhanced mental health services, and 15 percent favored "better school security." Just 7 percent mentioned arming teachers. In a separate question, just 1 in 5 teachers agreed that arming teachers and staff members would make schools safer. At the same time, 22 percent said it would make schools about as safe as they are now, while 58 percent said it would make schools less safe. When asked which specific measures would be "most effective" at preventing school shootings, 57 percent favored universal background checks, and the same number, 57 percent, also favored banning the sale of semiautomatic weapons such as the one used in the Parkland attack. The pollsters noted that the partisan leanings of teachers may influence their beliefs about gun safety. Teachers as a group are twice as likely to identify as, or lean, Democratic rather than Republican. For teachers, school shootings are also a workplace safety issue. About 60 percent of teachers describe their schools as "very" or "somewhat" prepared and protected. As one indicator of preparedness, the National Center for Education Statistics reports that more than 9 in 10 public schools now conduct active shooter drills. And, despite the intense media coverage, a majority of teachers, 64 percent, said in the Gallup poll that they are "not too worried" or "not worried at all" about being the victim of a school shooting, and 55 percent said their students felt the same way. Perhaps that's because school shootings, even in the broadest sense of the term, remain relatively rare: The National Center for Education Statistics counts 98,271 public schools and 33,619 private schools in the U.S., in the most recent year these numbers were available. An analysis conducted by The Washington Post found 193 schools where a weapon was fired during school hours in the past 20 years. NPR Education...

For Some Students, #DeleteFacebook Is Not Really an Option

I entered my junior year of high school without a Facebook account. But a few months later, that changed. My AP English Language teacher had been using a Facebook group for our class to answer students’ questions after hours. She never told anyone in my class they had to create a Facebook account, but I felt like by not having one, I was missing out on valuable information and conversations. In light of the recent uproar over Facebook’s snafu with Cambridge Analytica, a number of people have pledged to #DeleteFacebook. But for some students whose class assignments and discussions are tied to the social network, it’s not as simple as it sounds. Once upon a time, educators like Sarah Jackson—the aforementioned teacher—found Facebook to be a handy tool for class. Years later, she explains to me that one reason she found it convenient was that it was more efficient than email. Over email, she was limited to answering a student’s question individually, when there was a chance that there were other students with the same question. The Facebook group let students with the same question see the question and answer at the same time. She also liked posting links to articles, and enjoyed seeing students do so too. Jackson now teaches at Zurich International in Switzerland. She stayed with her Facebook group method her first two years of teaching there, but stopped once the school started using Google Classroom. She felt like having both would be redudant. She says if she was still using Facebook groups, she doesn’t think the recent news about the company would bother her. She explains that the quizzes that can gather someone’s data usually show up on personal feeds, not on group pages. Even before the latest Facebook controversy, students like AnnaLee Barclay had plenty of reasons to get off the platform. She says when she was a junior at the University of San Diego, she left Facebook because she wanted a mental health break. Someone she went to high school with had passed away, and she was seeing sad content on her newsfeed. At the same time, she says the political climate was starting to be frustrating. “I was trying to be more aware of what I was allowing into my brain,” says Barclay, who graduated in 2016. However, her absence from Facebook only lasted about two to three months. It was difficult for her to stay in the loop about fundraisers and meetings that her university would hold. She was in the school’s outdoor adventures club that used Facebook to keep members posted. Then there were academic reasons. She had small classes, and while a lot of people knew each other by name, she didn’t necessarily have their phone numbers. Facebook ultimately provided the most convenient way for her to get in touch. If she missed a class or wanted clarity on an assignment, she was used to going on Facebook, searching a classmate’s name and then mesaging them. Leslie Adame, a freshman at the University of California, Los Angeles, says she’s...

50 years ago, Dr. King told these Philly kids to lay a blueprint, and they did

Dennis Kemp didn’t know who was going to climb out of the limousine. Kemp was a 9th grader at Barratt Junior High School in October 1967 when the school's vice principal asked him and other members of the stage crew to greet a guest arriving for a special assembly. Kemp, who played on the school’s basketball team, thought the mystery celebrity might be the Philadelphia 76ers behemoth Wilt Chamberlain. Then the car door swung open, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped out onto South 16th Street. “It was amazing,” Kemp said. “I’ll never forget it.” King was in town for a star-studded rally at the Spectrum, the since-demolished sports arena that King would describe that day as a “new, impressive structure.” Thanks to a connection made by legendary Philly DJ Georgie Woods (“the guy with the goods”), King stopped first at Barratt, which has since been shuttered. He spoke for just 20 minutes, riveting the mostly black student body with a speech that focused on uplift, racial pride, and putting the onus on them to make better lives. “I wanna ask you a question,” King began. “And that is: What is in your life’s blueprint?” The Philadelphia Public School Notebook...

Can a New Approach to Information Literacy Reduce Digital Polarization?

The internet doesn’t come with an instruction manual, but it should—to give users the skills to separate truth from falsehood so they can distinguish between propaganda and the indisputable and confirmable. And colleges should be the place leading students through this reference book. That’s the argument of Michael Caulfield, director of blended and networked learning at Washington State University Vancouver, and it isn’t just some “hot take” designed to be provocative. He actually wrote the manual. And he has already convinced more than a dozen colleges to adopt it (and more than 100 college libraries to prominently link to it). Recently, he’s started research in an effort to prove that it works (and can help preserve American democracy). Plenty of people are talking about the importance of information literacy these days, and many educational institutions see it as part of their mission. And yet it’s more complicated than it seems. Earlier this month researcher danah boyd gave a provocative keynote speech at SXSW EDU arguing that media-literacy efforts at colleges are “backfiring,” turning out graduates that are good at questioning everything, and selectively believing what their gut tells them is true. In fact, boyd worries that this feeling of not knowing what to believe can draw students into extremist websites, which promise clear answers. Caulfield has noticed some of the same issues among students he’s worked with. “A lot of people are worried that students are just these gullible rubes believing everything,” he said, but that’s not what he typically sees. In a recent blog post, he described a student who dismissed the right-leaning Breitbart News because it is funded by the Mercers hoping to use it to influence political debate, and was equally dismissive of The Washington Post because it is owned by Jeff Bezos, who has given money to Democrats. Those situations are hardly equivalent, he says, but can make it easy for information consumers to simply throw up their hands. “Without feeling empowered to sort fiction on the web a lot of students are merely cynical and believe they can’t trust anything,” said Caulfield in an interview with EdSurge. “Our hope is by giving students the tools to evaluate this stuff quickly that we’ll take a chunk out of some of the cynicism.” “You can get focused so much on the agenda and the supposed agenda of people telling you things,” he adds, “that you lose a lot of the gradations of true and false.” That’s where Caulfield’s manual comes in. Its purpose is to instill in students “a habit of fact checking, and get people to build more complex models of the world than they currently have.” He stresses that the goal is not to just establish that some experts are always right and others wrong, but to give students the tools to judge information on a case-by-case basis. Infotrap Ahead It’s easier than ever to for a misleading lie to spread online. It happened to me just a few weeks ago. There it was in my social media feed, an article from Sports...

Poll: Most U.S. Teachers Want Gun Control, Not Guns To Carry

LA Johnson/NPR LA Johnson/NPR Nearly three fourths of U.S. teachers do not want to carry guns in school, and they overwhelmingly favor gun control measures over security steps meant to "harden" schools, according to a new Gallup poll. The nationally representative poll of nearly 500 K-12 teachers was conducted earlier this month, after the Parkland shooting and student protests brought national attention to the issue of gun violence. Some of the poll was released last week. In that portion, 73 percent of teachers opposed training teachers and staff to carry guns in school. Of those, 63 percent "strongly" opposed the proposal. In addition, 7 in 10 teachers said arming teachers would not be effective in limiting casualties in a school shooting. In the part of the poll released today, teachers were asked in an open-ended question to name one thing that could be done to prevent U.S. school shootings. One-third named gun control or stricter gun laws, the most popular response. The second leading response, with 22 percent, was bans on specific guns. One in 5 suggested enhanced mental health services and 15 percent favored "better school security." Just 7 percent mentioned arming teachers. In a separate question, just 1 in 5 teachers agreed that arming teachers and staff members would make schools safer. At the same time, 22 percent said it would make schools about as safe as they are now, while 58 percent said it would make schools less safe. When asked which specific measures would be "most effective" at preventing school shootings, 57 percent favored universal background checks, and the same number, 57 percent, also favored banning the sale of semi-automatic weapons such as the one used in the Parkland attack. The pollsters noted that the partisan leanings of teachers may influence their beliefs about gun safety. Teachers as a group are twice as likely to identify as, or lean, Democratic rather than Republican. For teachers, school shootings are also a workplace safety issue. About 60 percent of teachers describe their schools as "very" or "somewhat" prepared and protected. As one indicator of preparedness, the National Center for Education Statistics reports that more than 9 in 10 public schools now conduct active shooter drills. And, despite the intense media coverage, a majority of teachers, 64 percent, said in the Gallup poll that they are "not too worried" or "not worried at all" about being the victim of a school shooting, and 55 percent said their students felt the same way. Perhaps that's because school shootings, even in the broadest sense of the term, remain relatively rare: The National Center for Education Statistics counts 98,271 public schools and 33,619 private schools in the U.S., in the most recent year these numbers were available. An analysis conducted by the Washington Post found 193 schools where a weapon was fired during school hours in the last 20 years. NPR Education...

Follow us on Instagram